Theology for Lent: Clingman Forum

During March, Clingman Forum presents 4 sessions designed to deepen our understanding of both our Episcopal tradition and our relationship with God:

bkirbyBlackBkgdMarch 8
Our Call to Common Prayer, Part 1, with Brian Kirby, M.Div.
We will explore how Episcopal liturgical theology has developed out of Anglican theology in our American context, and look at some of the early editions of the Book of Common Prayer and liturgical practices to understand how they have influenced our life of worship.

March 15
Our Call to Common Prayer, Part 2, with Brian Kirby, M.Div.
We will explore the most recent revision of the Book of Common Prayer (1979) and subsequent supplemental materials to see how they shape our life of worship and our understanding of God.

Brian Kirby has a Master of Divinity degree from Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Berkeley, CA.


jKlassenMarch 22
Small God in a Big World? with Dr. Justin D. Klassen
Contemporary science offers us a picture of the universe as astoundingly old, enormous, and dynamic. By comparison, the common Christian assumption that God is ultimately concerned only with human beings (and even then, only some of them) gives us a strangely narrow view of reality. Does God care about the universe beyond humanity? Are there resources in the Christian tradition that can help us answer this question? How might they change our view of the Creator’s agenda for the creature?
Dr. Justin D. Klassen is Assistant Professor of Theology at Bellarmine University. He received his Ph.D. from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.


gregHillis500xMarch 29
What Happened at Fourth & Walnut? A Brief Examination of Thomas Merton’s Thought, with Dr. Gregory Hillis.
On March 18, 1958 Merton had an experience – a vision – that would shape his life and work until his death in 1968.  This experience occurred at the corner of Fourth & Walnut (now Fourth & Muhammad Ali) in downtown Louisville; Merton wrote about it in his book Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander.  Join us as we talk about Merton’s Fourth & Walnut experience and ask how it might influence our own understanding of our place in the world and our unity with all humankind.
Dr. Gregory Hillis is Associate Professor of Theology at Bellarmine University.  He received his Ph.D. from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.

Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.